Mumbai housing society grows organic veggies; turns garbage into fertilizer 

On the daily basis, the 131 families produce around 60 kg of wet waste. They gather the trash in the building's backyard and use the aerobic composting process to transform it into fertilizer. This was initiated to prevent the trash from being dumped in the city's dump yards.

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Image source: The Better India

A housing society in Wadala, Mumbai has not called for the BMC's (Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation) waste collection truck for over two years. The residents of the Emgee Greens society has been composting the waste.

According to BMC's Environment Status Report, between 6,500 to 6,800 metric tonnes of garbage were generated in Mumbai in 2019-2020. Recognizing the rising problem, the society decided to move to become a zero-waste community.

On the daily basis, the 131 families produce around 60 kg of wet waste. They gather the trash in the building's backyard and use the aerobic composting process to transform it into fertilizer. This was initiated to prevent the trash from being dumped in the city's dump yards.

In a statement, the president of the society Ashwin Fernandes mentioned that in the society, there are 131 families. Though they were pleased with their efforts to minimize waste, there was no one willing to buy the fertilizer they were producing. 1 tonne of fertilizer has been produced so far from the everyday waste produced. 

Certain members of society use the fertilizer daily in their houses. Suhail Merchant used to grow flowers while Sunil Deshpande grew vegetables like spinach and coriander on his balcony.

The inhabitants of Emgee Greens now harvest 90 kilos of vegetables each month from their terrace. On the contrary, Suhail, Sunil and Atharv Deshpande spend plenty of time on the terraced estate. They also hold farming seminars on Sunday where all the residents participate in organic farming training.


Residents are not only recycling garbage to cultivate organic crops, but they are also recycling other waste products to make farming beds. Old water bottles, buckets, cupboards, beds and other things are used to cultivate vegetables.